Feminists and the Weak Men Who Empower Them

Christopher DeGroot has written a wildly unpopular but wholly truthful and important essay about men and women and the urgency of the problem created in western culture by feminists and the weak men who empower them. An excerpt:

“In this essay I shall argue that masculine reassertion is necessary for authority’s sake and for keeping the US competitive at the international level and the culture stable (“the principle of order”). For in time, there is little social order without sufficient male authority, and excellence, too, declines insofar as resentful manipulation and hysteria—the latter historically a distinctly female phenomenon—triumph over sober judgment and rationality. Needless to say, in an inherently competitive world, such a situation is not desirable. What could be better for the Chinese, our chief and quite ruthless competitor, than our corporations and universities forever enabling meritocracy to give way to gender-based hiring quotas, that unjust feminist imperative?

Like the ancient Greeks, the ancient Chinese associated order with men and chaos with women. Certainly no informed person, knowledgeable about the history of human institutions, could believe that safe spaces, microaggressions, bias response teams and the like ever would have arisen in any male-only or male-dominated context. As feminists rightly give us to understand, the characteristic vices of men—violence, harshness, insensitivity—are on the other side of the psychological spectrum. Lee Jussim and other social psychologists have shown that “gender stereotypes are mostly accurate,” and that “Stereotype accuracy is one of the largest and most replicable effects in all of … Read the rest

There’s Still Hope for a Baritone

#5M16 was once a great soprano who effortlessly delighted folks who’ve heard choirs in cathedrals in Rome, Paris and London. Unfortunately, our schola hasn’t been the same since he became a baritone (or whatever he claims to be now). I’m proud to announce I’ve discovered a solution:

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Help Us Please

Hi friends, I need four more people to join me and help us help the Pervaiz family, six Christians stranded in Thailand who are legally barred from begging or working and are thus entirely dependent upon our help. If you’ll donate just $16 a month, you will have provided this entire family with food and shelter for a day.

These are verified real people with real needs and 100% of your tax-deductible contributions go directly to their food and shelter. Donate here:

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Nothing to See Here

Benedict wants to blame the 1960s for the sex abuse problem. He doesn’t address how this explains the sex abuse which began decades earlier and was enabled by the widespread corruption and perversion already entrenched in the episcopate before the 60s. The man who abandoned his post now praises the work of Francis and wants the faithful to look the other way.

One friend on Facebook tried to explain Benedict’s actions as a criticism of Francis, although Benedict closes the essay with this gem:

At the end of my reflections I would like to thank Pope Francis for everything he does to show us, again and again, the light of God, which has not disappeared, even today. Thank you, Holy Father

Another friend observed that Benedict was subtly contradicting the Francis approach to things.

However, I’m of the mind that Ratzinger was a big part of the problem. He was a periti at the council, he was a major influence on the new theology, he was the right hand man to JP2 for all those years, who presided over the greatest collapse in the Church since the Arian crisis, and when it was his own time to make the tough decisions as Pope, he quit. (All this having been said, I don’t deny the good he did with SP and the lifting of the unjust excommunications).

If he’s having a crisis of conscience, it doesn’t indicate that he truly understands the nature of the problem (which is not pedophilia). If … Read the rest

Church, Government or Bank?

Sorry for the poor quality picture.

This photo from c. 1880 hangs in the refectory at the Church of the Assumption in Nashville. The photographer was looking south at Capitol Hill, with the church in the foreground. If you’ve ever traveled through Europe or Latin America, you know that in most cities the church was placed in the center and often at the highest point in the city.

Isn’t it interesting that in the United States it is either a government building or a government-backed bank that took the church’s place in town? … Read the rest