How the FBI Really Works

Thanks to Trump’s fight with the Deep State, regular Americans have gotten a peek under the covers of how the FBI really works.

Previously known only to federal prosecutors, criminal defense attorneys and those targeted by the FBI (such as yours truly):

  • FBI agents routinely lie to get warrants, entrap targets, gain indictments and secure plea deals
  • The DOJ frequently breaks the law to pressure targets to plead guilty
  • No adult citizen, no matter how virtuous, is actually ‘innocent’ under the law (given the number and scope of federal statutes and the intentionally vague nature of many)
  • Many “crimes” involve no quantifiable harm and no identifiable victim

Tom Woods explores examples here.… Read the rest

The Deep State Flexes

It used to be that the communications between attorney and client were protected, but now, if you lose an election, you can get your friends in the NSA to wiretap your opponent and your friends in the DOJ to manufacture evidence, they can then both leak to the MSM so your friends in Congress will call for a Special Counsel, who will then seize the once-protected communications, so you can charge the President with obstructing the justice he is obliged to enforce, and refer the case to congress to impeach (which they will, assuming the Dems win in November).

Asking the rhetorical question again, “If they can do this to a billionaire President of the United States, what can they do to you?” #HomeOfTheFree

P.S.  Please don’t counter that the DOJ and FBI are respecting attorney-client privilege when the DOJ and the FBI are the organizations that worked with Hillary Clinton to weaponize the FISA process and turn our foreign intelligence agencies into domestic espionage organizations for the use of the Left.

Read the rest

Mueller’s History of Abusing Power to Entrap Others

Years later I ran into Mueller, and I told him of my disappointment in being the target of a sting where there was no reason to think that I would knowingly present perjured evidence to a court. Mueller, half-apologetically, told me that he never really thought that I would suborn perjury, but that he had a duty to pursue the lead given to him. (That “lead,” of course, was provided by a fellow that we lawyers, among ourselves, would indelicately refer to as a “scumbag.”)

https://news.wgbh.org/2017/10/17/silverglate-how-robert-mueller-tried-entrap-me… Read the rest

Eating a Donut Can Send You to Jail

We incarcerate people at a rate matched only by North Korea. Why? It would seem there are only three possible explanations:

1) Our justice system is vastly better at catching bad guys than anyone else in the world
2) Our citizens are much more prone to criminality than anyone else in the world
3) Something is wrong

Here’s an article I recommend at ReasonRead the rest

Worse Than Rape or Murder

Winston was 68 years old, 5’6”, slightly hunched, with pale skin and a rapid fire manner of delivery.  I first met him when he was transferred to Marion from Butner Medical Center after having surprised (and disappointed) many people in the Bureau of Prisons by surviving his third round of cancer.

He was not the type of person to suffer fools, and would respond to any inquiry about him or his past by asking a series of questions designed to determine, in his mind, whether the subject of his interrogation was worth spending time with.  As he would later explain to me, after 20 years in federal prison, he didn’t think he had time to waste on inmates who placed no value on time simply because it was in such supply.

Winston was the founder and CEO of a hugely successful property and casualty insurance company in Illinois.  He built his madoff100614_2_560company by specializing in hard to insure properties and businesses and collecting what was then an enormous amount of data about his clients so he could both better design policies and help them to reduce losses.  The combination of his insuring higher-risk (and thus, higher premium paying), clients and diligent underwriting made him wealthy by the time he was 40.  

As often happens to successful men, he grew bored and decided to tackle new challenges.  Some state laws at the time prohibited companies like his from competing across multiple jurisdictions.  There were also other laws in the state of Read the rest

Winston was 68 years old, 5’6”, slightly hunched, with pale skin and a rapid fire manner of delivery.  I first met him when he was transferred to Marion from Butner Medical Center after having surprised (and disappointed) many people in the Bureau of Prisons by surviving his third round of cancer.

He was not the type of person to suffer fools, and would respond to any inquiry about him or his past by asking a series of questions designed to determine, in his mind, whether the subject of his interrogation was worth spending time with.  As he would later explain to me, after 20 years in federal prison, he didn’t think he had time to waste on inmates who placed no value on time simply because it was in such supply.

Winston was the founder and CEO of a hugely successful property and casualty insurance company in Illinois.  He built his madoff100614_2_560company by specializing in hard to insure properties and businesses and collecting what was then an enormous amount of data about his clients so he could both better design policies and help them to reduce losses.  The combination of his insuring higher-risk (and thus, higher premium paying), clients and diligent underwriting made him wealthy by the time he was 40.  

As often happens to successful men, he grew bored and decided to tackle new challenges.  Some state laws at the time prohibited companies like his from competing across multiple jurisdictions.  There were also other laws in the state of Read the rest