A Man’s Musings About Dating and Courtship

Posting by an Anonymous Friend

Courting/manosphere lessons so far this year (meeting one woman a month; low-grade, short-term successes but people aren’t meant for this revolving door):

1. If the girl goes cold, cut contact immediately. No matter how attached she was before (four-hour video calls in which she even talks about marriage). Literally no questions asked. Don’t ask/whine/plead, “What’s wrooooooong? Whyyyyyyy? We can work this oooout.” That’s weakness, which God made women hate; their survival instinct now gone wrong. A bit of socialization from mainstream culture I had to unlearn. By the third one this year I got it. Don’t even give her the chance to deliver the friends speech (got that once) or any other breakup cliché. And by “no contact” you’re not even thinking of trying to get her back, although it gives you a sliver of a chance. (Two have come back to me.) It’s for your own dignity and peace of mind. Don’t be needy.

2. Obvious: the friends speech IS for losers. I actually prefer “no” or even being ghosted. If you hear/read it, leave quietly without saying anything. It doesn’t deserve an answer. No more contact. Anyway, Mike Pence is right; wise. A Catholic turned evangelical smarter than most practicing Catholics. For me, it’s 1960 (no surprise): no to opposite-sex friendships. There are beautiful married acquaintances I’d informally call friends; I’d never be alone with them. There are associates’ wives and girlfriends with whom I am cordial. They are not friends. I don’t … Read the rest

Dealing with a ‘Bad Dad’

A kid asked, “If a Pope is a bad Pope, but he’s still the Pope and there’s nothing we can do about it, how do we know when we can ignore him?”

Short answer: when he opens his mouth.

Long Pedantic Dad answer: whenever he says something a) novel, or b) contrary to what the Church teaches, or c) factually errant, or d) contrary to common sense.

P.S. No disrespect to the Orthodox (or Protestants, Jews, Muslims, Atheists, etc), but ideas have consequences, and either you’re right, or I’m right, or we’re both wrong, and pretending otherwise is false charity.

Not satire:  Pope says seeking to convert non-Catholics is a grave sin

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Limbo Is Real

It used to be believed by Catholics that a place existed where souls who were destined for heaven but were prevented from the beatific vision remained, awaiting Christ’s Ascension, or in the case of those guilty only of original sin,  for some sort of divine indulgence (presumed).  Like so many other traditions of the Catholic Church this belief has been abandoned by laity and cleric alike.  But limbo IS real.  I live in limbo right now.

It is a component of the criminal “justice” system that when a convict is finished with the imposed sentence he will remain in a period of limbo for a period of time, in my case, three years.  The convict is no longer incarcerated, but is still subject to the full weight of the federal government.  Not that every living person isn’t already, but in a more particular way.  It is a quirk of the system that although I have retained my first amendment rights, and thus, I may write this post, and for the time being, practice my faith publicly, I have lost my 2nd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th and 14th amendment rights.  For the 99% of you unfamiliar with the Bill of Rights and other constitutional amendments, here’s a link.

In brief, because of my conviction for mail and securities fraud, I may not posses a firearm (or even be in close proximity to one, lest I be deemed to have potential control over it), I may not refuse any search, reasonable … Read the rest

Now I Can Speak

On my first day in federal prison, I was offered sex, drugs, alcohol and a cell phone, but it would be months before I had the opportunity to see a Catholic priest.

I had already spent nearly a year in a county jail, waiting to be sentenced and shipped to a federal prison, sharing a 15’x18’ concrete cell with 12 violent, career criminals, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.  During that 11 months, I believe I saw a Catholic priest on three occasions.  It might have been four, but it’s tough to remember those kinds of details when so much of that time was spent in adrenaline fueled survival mode, a bag of batteries in a sock in one hand for defense and a sharpened toothbrush in the other.  The Priest, pastor of the local Catholic church, came after tiring of my mother’s calls begging for him to visit me.  Or perhaps it was her prayers and not calls that were efficacious.

I was glad to see him.  His liturgy was not exactly the Missa Cantata I had frequented with my family prior to my arrest, but he brought with him forgiveness and compassion-as rare in prison as in the world.

Over the course of my 40 months in federal custody, Catholic services were rare.  In contrast, evangelical protestants had frequent-as often as daily-services.  The Jehovah’s Witnesses and the Nation of Islam were also very active, both in their evangelization and their activities.  It was not at all … Read the rest