A Man’s Musings About Dating and Courtship

Posting by an Anonymous Friend

Courting/manosphere lessons so far this year (meeting one woman a month; low-grade, short-term successes but people aren’t meant for this revolving door):

1. If the girl goes cold, cut contact immediately. No matter how attached she was before (four-hour video calls in which she even talks about marriage). Literally no questions asked. Don’t ask/whine/plead, “What’s wrooooooong? Whyyyyyyy? We can work this oooout.” That’s weakness, which God made women hate; their survival instinct now gone wrong. A bit of socialization from mainstream culture I had to unlearn. By the third one this year I got it. Don’t even give her the chance to deliver the friends speech (got that once) or any other breakup cliché. And by “no contact” you’re not even thinking of trying to get her back, although it gives you a sliver of a chance. (Two have come back to me.) It’s for your own dignity and peace of mind. Don’t be needy.

2. Obvious: the friends speech IS for losers. I actually prefer “no” or even being ghosted. If you hear/read it, leave quietly without saying anything. It doesn’t deserve an answer. No more contact. Anyway, Mike Pence is right; wise. A Catholic turned evangelical smarter than most practicing Catholics. For me, it’s 1960 (no surprise): no to opposite-sex friendships. There are beautiful married acquaintances I’d informally call friends; I’d never be alone with them. There are associates’ wives and girlfriends with whom I am cordial. They are not friends. I don’t … Read the rest

Feminists and the Weak Men Who Empower Them

Christopher DeGroot has written a wildly unpopular but wholly truthful and important essay about men and women and the urgency of the problem created in western culture by feminists and the weak men who empower them. An excerpt:

“In this essay I shall argue that masculine reassertion is necessary for authority’s sake and for keeping the US competitive at the international level and the culture stable (“the principle of order”). For in time, there is little social order without sufficient male authority, and excellence, too, declines insofar as resentful manipulation and hysteria—the latter historically a distinctly female phenomenon—triumph over sober judgment and rationality. Needless to say, in an inherently competitive world, such a situation is not desirable. What could be better for the Chinese, our chief and quite ruthless competitor, than our corporations and universities forever enabling meritocracy to give way to gender-based hiring quotas, that unjust feminist imperative?

Like the ancient Greeks, the ancient Chinese associated order with men and chaos with women. Certainly no informed person, knowledgeable about the history of human institutions, could believe that safe spaces, microaggressions, bias response teams and the like ever would have arisen in any male-only or male-dominated context. As feminists rightly give us to understand, the characteristic vices of men—violence, harshness, insensitivity—are on the other side of the psychological spectrum. Lee Jussim and other social psychologists have shown that “gender stereotypes are mostly accurate,” and that “Stereotype accuracy is one of the largest and most replicable effects in all of … Read the rest

Church, Government or Bank?

Sorry for the poor quality picture.

This photo from c. 1880 hangs in the refectory at the Church of the Assumption in Nashville. The photographer was looking south at Capitol Hill, with the church in the foreground. If you’ve ever traveled through Europe or Latin America, you know that in most cities the church was placed in the center and often at the highest point in the city.

Isn’t it interesting that in the United States it is either a government building or a government-backed bank that took the church’s place in town? … Read the rest

The Revolution Continues, Aided by Left and Right

Few people know this-and fewer care-but it’s a matter of Catholic doctrine that private property rights are sacred. Pope Leo XIII warned of the consequences of ignoring divine law in Rerum Novarum in 1891 when he wrote, “the socialists, working on the poor man’s envy of the rich, are striving to do away with private property, and contend that individual possessions should become the common property of all, to be administered by the State or by municipal bodies.”

Predictably, the revolutionary mindset he warned about has overtaken all but a few, such that even “conservatives” are horrified that Starbucks would ask someone who a) demands free services and b) refuses to buy anything, to leave. With the criminalization of thought, the war on parental rights, persecution of churches and religious groups and now the open assault on private property rights, we’ve thus passed one more critical milestone on our descent into the tyranny of the mob. If a $20 billion a year corporation and the cops are afraid of the mob, what are your chances at defending your property and lives?

http://www.foxnews.com/food-drink/2018/04/19/philadelphia-police-commissioner-apologizes-to-2-men-arrested-at-starbucks.html… Read the rest

Chaos, Complexity, Uncertainty and Control

I have found the study of chaos and uncertainty to be fascinating, especially as it regards human behavior, perception and decision making.  Chaos and complexity, or even the perception of them, have profound influence on the way we think and the decisions we make.  As I reflect on my life and judgments, I see how chaos can help to radically refine previously held assumptions and quickly narrow priorities.  It can also bewilder and paralyze.  Complexity can be equally difficult to consider.  I know that some of my worst decisions resulted in a failure to adequately contemplate every conceivable outcome from a decision.  In fact, that’s probably impossible to do, which ought to require an increased abundance of prudence in decision making, particularly where the risks and costs of failure are both high, or even if it is only the latter.  That rare event with catastrophic events shouldn’t be discounted.

It is interesting to me also, from a societal standpoint, how groups of people respond to these things.  Beyond chaos and complexity is the uncertainty of future (or even present) realities.  What we believe to be true about ourselves and others is usually wrong.  We tend to overstate our own strengths and others’ weaknesses.  This inability to accurately evaluate reality should frighten us and greatly undermine our confidence in making decisions.

After a few years on ‘sabbatical’, dealing with a rather closed society well-suited to extensive study and observation, and a great deal of ‘free’ time to reflect, I have reached … Read the rest